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Recruiter Services - Advertising Pointers

Prospect Opinions

When considering any advertisement a prospect will have positive and negative opinions of both the business and the opportunity.

Note the positives: How do you use these to attract candidates

Note the negatives: How can you overcome or evade these

1. Why are you looking to advertise?

Clearly know the reasons

Is this an inspirational advertisement?

2. What claims are you making about your business and the role?

What is the 'unique selling point'?

3. Given that your advertisement may be one of many similar advertisements, does it do the following?

a. Immediately identify with the key candidates that you would like to respond?

b. Provide immediate basic understanding (in the first few seconds)

c. Cover your key claim/unique selling point

4. Do you know who you are aiming at:

a. location

b. Skill sets: Must have/ would like to have

c. Timing: When can start

d. Your own business training: given you may have an 'in house process or system?'

5. Why would a candidate respond to your advertisement?

Look at your advertisement what are the key reasons that a prospective candidate would use in order to respond. Equally why would they not respond what would you like to see.

Put yourself in their shoes if you can, the answers that you give are likely to be the answers that your prospective candidates will give.

Salary, location, hours of work, specific skills, Training, prospects, company background, working conditions, pension, and any specific benefits that you would offer as opposed to your competitors.

6. Headlines

Does it clearly identify the company, key candidates, offer, and benefits?

The headline has only a fraction of time in which to gain the favorable attention of the candidate, it is only after this has hooked the prospect that your copy will work to give the prospect a better idea of your business.

Reader gravity suggests at least in the western world documents and books etc are read from the top left hand side of the page to the bottom right. So bear this in mind when you structure your advertisement.

Given the above however 'A picture speaks a thousand words' if you place a picture or illustration for that matter be aware that this image is likely to attract the attention of the prospective candidate so it will need to be strong and reflect one or a number of your key selling points, so type above the image may be missed because reader gravity will continue from the image.

Make sure that all of the parts of your advertisement are easy for the candidate to navigate. The Headline and illustration are linked does this then link to the main copy and the call to action.

Use 'testimonials' if you can this gives candidates a sense of well being.

Every business has its secret language words and phrases that the user may understand but candidates may not, try to avoid the use of jargon.

Unless your business has a very specific requirement and you are looking to attract a very specific individual.

Think about the question that we all ask on occasion 'what’s in it for me'

Remember you are selling your opportunity to the market; provide supporting evidence and guarantees about your business and the success that the candidate will achieve.

Do not forget the 'Call to Action'

Your address, phone number and E-Mail. Instructions about how candidates should respond and what they should do. A time limit to responses so that you can plan your time for interviews. An idea for the candidate when the role will start.

Look at it would it stimulate you to respond!


 
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